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NEWS RELEASES - via EurekAlert!

Separating methane and CO2 will become more efficient

( KU Leuven) To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes: filters that stop the methane and let the CO2 pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.

Nice ice, maybe: Study finds water-repelling surfaces ease ice removal

( University of Nebraska-Lincoln) A new study has discovered that ice grows differently on water-absorbent vs. water-repellent surfaces. The research suggests that applying water-repellent coatings to windshields before winter storms -- or engineering surfaces that inherently repel water -- could enable a strong breeze to handle the burden of ice removal.

New Amazon threat? Deforestation from mining

( University of Vermont) Sprawling mining operations in Brazil have caused roughly 10 percent of all Amazon rainforest deforestation between 2005 and 2015 -- much higher than previous estimates -- says the first comprehensive study of mining deforestation in the iconic tropical rainforest. Surprisingly, the majority of mining deforestation (a full 90%) occurred outside the mining leases granted by Brazil's government, the new study in Nature Communications finds.

TGen develops processing procedures for 'single-cell' sequencing

( The Translational Genomics Research Institute) The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) today announced grant support from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) donor advised fund, an advised fund of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, that will help revolutionize how researchers identify the genetic source of diseases and how best to treat each patient.

Bridging the terahertz gap

( Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard researchers are exploring the possibility of using an infrared frequency comb to generate elusive terahertz frequencies. These frequencies -- which lie in the electromagnetic spectrum between radio waves and infrared light -- have long promised to transform communications and sensing but are very challenging to source. By harnessing a recently discovered laser state, SEAS researchers have discovered an infrared frequency comb in a quantum cascade laser that offers a new way to generate terahertz frequencies.

Crowdsourced game aims to find solutions to aflatoxin

( University of California - Davis) Mars, Inc., UC Davis and partners have launched a crowdsourcing initiative to solve the problem of aflatoxin contamination of crops. A series of aflatoxin puzzles will go online on Foldit, a platform that allows gamers to explore how amino acids are folded together to create proteins. Successful candidates from the computer game will be tested in the laboratory of Justin Siegel, assistant professor of chemistry, biochemistry and molecular medicine at UC Davis.

Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-rays

( Georgia Institute of Technology) Imagine Google Earth with only the street view and a far-away satellite view but not much of a map view. Brain imaging, for the most part, has been missing just that, and a lot of research on how the brain computes happens on that map-like level. New imaging tackles this special view of the brain with the highest-energy X-rays in the country that illuminate thick sections of a mouse brain.

Therapeutic form of arsenic is a potential treatment for deadly type of brain cancer

( The Translational Genomics Research Institute) In a study led by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), this anti-cancer agent is being considered for use against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive type of deadly brain tumors. The study was published today in Molecular Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

New research opens the door to 'functional cure' for HIV

( Scripps Research Institute) Scientists have for the first time shown that a novel compound effectively suppresses production of the virus in chronically infected cells.

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

( DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on Aug. 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.


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